bill haslam

Black urges Haslam to sign ‘anti-sanctuary cities bill;’ rally urges veto of ‘mass deportation bill’

U.S. Rep. Diane Black, who is running for governor, issued a press release Thursday calling on current Gov. Bill Haslam to sign an “anti-Sanctuary Cities” bill that requires state and local law enforcement officers to assist federal immigration officials in detaining undocumented immigrants.

The Tennessee Immigration and Refugee Rights Coalition, on the other hand, held a rally at the state Capitol Thursday evening to call for a veto of the group calls a “mass deportation bill.” TIRRC says “hundreds” attended, reports The Tennessean. And the Southern Poverty Law Center sent Haslam a letter saying the bill is unconstitutional.

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Shelby County Commission to Haslam: Veto anti-sanctuary cities bill

Shelby County commissioners approved a resolution Monday that urges Gov. Bill Haslam to veto a bill that would require local and state law enforcement agencies to work with federal immigration agents on immigration matters, reports the Memphis Daily News.

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With two new nominees, Trump completes TN U.S. marshal appointments (all three previous GOP political appointees)

Former state Rep. Barrett Rich, currently a member of the Tennessee state Board of Paroles, and Denny King, who headed the state Department of Safety under former Gov. Don Sundquist, have been nominated by President Trump to become U.S. Marshals.

Rich (R-Somerville) chose not to seek reelection to the House District 94 seat in 2014 and was appointed after his term expired to the Board of Paroles by Gov. Bill Haslam. King previously served as U.S. marshal for Middle Tennessee, after his tenure as safety commissioner, under appointment of former President George W. Bush.

Trump had previously nominated David Jolley as U.S. marshal for East Tennessee and his appointment has been confirmed by the U.S. Senate. The King and Rich nominations await confirmation. Jolley also served as U.S. marshal for East Tennessee under former President George W. Bush and is the husband of Jane Jolley, East Tennessee field coordinator for Sen. Bob Corker.

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Haslam leaves open possibility of vetoing bill to protect Confederate monuments

Gov. Bill Haslam is leaving open the possibility of vetoing a bill inspired by City of Memphis’ moves to remove Confederate monuments from local parks and aimed at preventing any such actions in the future, reports the Times Free Press.

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Legislature sends governor bill backing ‘monument to the unborn”

In the last hours of the legislative session, a bill favoring erection of a “monument to unborn children” on the state capitol grounds was sent to the governor after a House-Senate dispute over wording of the measure was resolved.

Apparently, the bill is to be viewed as making a request for the monument to the State Capitol Commission; not the mandate that was included in the original version. And Gov. Bill Haslam says he and his staff will be reviewing the bill before he decides whether to sign it.

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Haslam praises legislators for passing most of his agenda (exceptions not noted)

Press release from the governor’s office

NASHVILLE – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam today thanked members of the 110th General Assembly for keeping Tennessee on pace to lead the nation in jobs, education and efficient and effective government.

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Squabbles over ‘poison pill’ and herbal remedy resolved to approve Haslam’s opioid bills

Final legislative approval of Gov. Bill Haslam’s two bills dealing with opioid addiction came Wednesday after the House and Senate resolved squabbles over details that had gained little public attention but touched of heated arguments among lawmakers.

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Haslam to host Blackburn fundraiser; sees difficult year for GOP in governor races

In a brief interview with Fox News, posted on the Republican Governors Association website, Gov. Bill Haslam declares U.S. Senate candidate Marsha Blackburn “a great friend and supporter” and says he will host a fundraiser for her next month.

Asked whether former governors make good U.S. senators, he says “most governors I know” who became senators “wind up being a little frustrated.” Blackburn’s presumptive November opponent, of course, is former Democratic Gov. Phil Bredesen. And one of the former governors he knows who became a senator is Tennessee’s Lamar Alexander.

Haslam is the current RGA chairman – “by default,” the interviewer suggests – and also says that Republicans face a difficult year in gubernatorial elections around the nation, though not specifically referring to Tennessee, and “we need to go into this with our eyes wide open and be alert.”

Legislature approves seven Haslam UT board appointments, including two last-minute nominees

The Tennessee General Assembly Tuesday evening approved seven of Gov. Bill Haslam’s proposed appointments to the University of Tennessee’s new board of trustees, reports the Times Free Press. That includes two new nominees submitted by the governor and rushed through the confirmation process as replacements to nominees spurned in the Senate earlier.

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Haslam’s ‘Complete College TN Act’ flops on House floor — a second setback for governor’s higher ed agenda

A bill cutting state-funded scholarships of college students who complete less than 30 hours of course work per year – part of Gov. Bill Haslam’s legislative package for the year – got more negative votes than positive votes on the House floor Monday.

The “Complete College Tennessee Act” (HB2114) has been promoted by the governor as a means of improving college graduation rates, now reported at 26 percent in two-year colleges and technical institutes and at 57 percent in four-year universities. But some legislators contend it would unfairly penalize students who are working while going to school, who are sidelined by illness for a semester or otherwise have valid reasons for completing 30 hours of credits in three semesters, as the bill requires.

(Update: On Tuesday, Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris, a sponsor, decided against putting the bill up for a Senate vote, remarking that “We should rename this the incomplete” college Tennessee  act.”

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