Protesters prompt McNally to push tighter security

A day after shouting protesters stopped two legislators from holding a Legislative Plaza press conference, Lt. Gov. Randy McNally said Thursday that a return to tighter security measures at the state Capitol complex is needed.

From The Tennessean:

McNally said… that he is considering reinstating a policy that was eliminated to require visitors to the legislature to have an ID scanned and wear a badge while visiting. He said some of the behavior from protestors, like preventing them from getting on elevators and leaving¬†“shouldn’t occur.”

“We’re in favor of going back to have a little more security,” McNally said.

The move would require a joint effort between both Senate and House leadership.

McNally said it may require an entry process similar to what is used in most schools, which require visitors to scan an ID at an entry point and wear a visitor’s badge.

“I think people having name tags on, it’s a little bit of a deterrent to being violent or disruptive,” McNally said.

Rep. Mike Stewart, D-Nashville, said constituents should have easy access to their representatives, and the House Democratic Caucus will soon begin having come-one-come-all type meetings weekly in the Plaza to allow constituents to ask questions.

“We should be bending over backwards to allow the public to come speak with us,” he said.

Note: Previous post on protesters stopping the new conference is HERE.

2 Responses to Protesters prompt McNally to push tighter security

  • Tony Michaels says:

    I think it’s deplorable when people can’t be courteous and responsible in their conduct. I watched the video on TV and was ashamed of my fellow Tennesseans. I understand and support peaceful protest but the behavior of some of these protestors was simply unwarranted. At no time should your rights override my rights.

    • STUART says:

      No Tony, not your “fellow Tennesseans,” but rather leftist Tennesseans, a small minority group with very bad upbringing that simply needs to be taught courtesy and responsibility through banishment, fines, and finally jail.

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