state capitol

Nobody goes there? House panel OKs Polk move

Gov. Bill Haslam attends a ceremony at the James K. Polk tomb in Nashville on Nov. 2, 2012. (Image credit: Gov. Bill Haslam’s office)

Supporters of moving the body of President James K. Polk body say he never wanted to be buried on the grounds of the state Capitol, a site about 500 feet from where his will called for him to be interred. So they want to move him about 50 miles south to Columbia, a city where he lived as a young man.

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Sexton postpones presser on unborn monument

Rep. Jerry Sexton (R-Bean Station) signals a vote on the House floor in Nashville on March 5, 2018. (Erik Schelzig/Tennessee Journal)

Rep. Jerry Sexton (R-Bean Station), the sponsor of the vetoed bill to make the Bible the official book of Tennessee, has postponed a Tuesday press conference on the creation of monument to the unborn on the grounds of the state Capitol. The official reason for the cancellation is “unforeseen circumstances.” Though one suspects that the fact that most of Nashville’s TV and print journalists are preoccupied with that little matter of the mayor’s resignation might have had something to do with it.

The event billed as the introduction of  an initiative to “recognize the men, women, and children affected by the tragedy of abortion and miscarriage” has been rescheduled for March 13.

 

Haslam sticks to his guns in banning firearms at Capitol

Gov. Bill Haslam said Monday he has no intention of changing his administration’s stance on barring handgun-carry permit holders from bringing their weapons into Tennessee’s state Capitol even though they will be allowed in the Cordell Hull Building where state legislators have offices and hold hearings, reports the Times Free Press.

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With N.B. Forrest staying at TN capitol, should W.G. ‘Parson’ Brownlow return?

At least three Democratic state legislators tell the Nashville Scene they’d like to see a portrait of Republican Gov. William G. “Parson” Brownlow returned to the state Capitol building, reversing a 1987 decision – when Democrats controlled the General Assembly – that sent the controversial Reconstruction governor’s likeness to the state museum. But the idea doesn’t seem to have much support from Republicans, now the state’s majority party.

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Haslam request to move Forrest bust rejected

The State Capitol Commission today rejected Gov. Bill Haslam’s request to move a bust of Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest from the lobby of the state Capitol building to the state museum. Seven of the members on hand opposed the move; five voted yes – and the tally could be seen as a legislature-versus-the-governor lineup.

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Prodded by Haslam, panel schedules meeting on Forrest bust

The State Capitol Commission, one of two state government entities that must approve the removal Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s bust from inside the Tennessee capitol building,  has scheduled a special meeting for Friday.

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Senate votes for Polk body relocation (Getting ‘cart before the hearse?’)

The Senate voted 20-6 with three abstentions Monday evening in favor of a resolution calling for disinterring the bodies of President James K. Polk and his wife, now in entombed on the state Capitol grounds, and moving them to his parents’ home in Columbia.

From WPLN’s report:

Some family members are objecting, but Senator Joey Hensley, whose district includes Columbia, says Polk will get more attention if he’s buried there.

“This is a first process,” he says. “We want to honor James K. Polk and his wife, and honor his legacy. Have him somewhere where every day people can talk about him and see what all he accomplished.

In addition to state lawmakers, the courts and the Tennessee Historical Commission have to sign off on the move.

In his will, Polk asked to buried at his home in Nashville. But after his widow, Sarah, died in the 1890s, his home was torn down, and his body was moved to the Capitol grounds.

Some relatives say he should remain there. But the James K. Polk Home & Museum says a burial on its grounds would hew to his wishes.

Note: One of those voting no, Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville, probably had the most notable comment. He said the language of the resolution (SJR141) struck him as “presumptuous on our part” — by suggesting relocation would be Polk’s preference, for example – and that Legislative approval should come after the matter has been through the court system, the Tennessee Historical Commission and the State Capitol Commission  — the last step, not the first.

“We may be getting the cart before the hearse in this case,” Norris said.

(Most recent previous post HERE.)